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NEW at the Doukhobor Genealogy Website

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NEW at the Doukhobor Genealogy Website

Posted: 1180327076000
Classification: Query
NEW at the Doukhobor Genealogy Website:

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Doukhobors in the Gross Isle Hospital Registers, 1899-1912
Between 1899 and 1912, over 2,465 Doukhobor immigrants were quarantined at the Grosse Isle Quarantine Station in Quebec upon their arrival in Canada. Of these, 235 were hospitalized due to disease and illness. The following is an index of Doukhobors who appear in the Grosse Isle hospital registers. It contains the full name, age, date of admission and date of release. Compiled from the Grosse Isle Database, Library and Archives Canada. http://www.doukhobor.org/Grosse-Isle.pdf

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Update - Doukhobor Births Registered in Saskatchewan, 1899-1907
This listing has been updated to include the full name, date of birth, location of birth, father's name, mother's name and registration number of 207 Doukhobor births registered in Saskatchewan in 1907. Compiled from records from the Saskatchewan Birth Index. http://www.doukhobor.org/SK-Births.pdf

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Index of Doukhobor Border Crossings in Michigan, 1920-1956
New! This is an index to border crossings of 90 Doukhobors arriving at Detroit, Sault Ste. Marie and Port Huron in the U.S. state of Michigan for permanent residence and temporary visits between 1920 and 1956. Information contained in this index includes: full name, age, birth date, birthplace, last residence, port of arrival, destination and microfilm number. Compiled from the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration database. http://www.doukhobor.org/Detroit.pdf

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Index of Doukhobor Border Crossings in Washington and Idaho, 1917-1924
This is an index to border crossings of 513 Doukhobors arriving at Seattle, Blaine, Northport and Marcus in the state of Washington, Eastport and Porthill in the state of Idaho, and Victoria and Vancouver in the province of British Columbia for permanent residence in the U.S. between 1917 and 1924. Information contained in this index includes: full name, age, birth date, birthplace, last residence, port of arrival, destination and microfilm number. Compiled from the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration database. http://www.doukhobor.org/Border-Washington-Idaho.pdf

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Doukhobor World War II Project
During World War II, most Doukhobors in Canada opposed military service based on their religious pacifist convictions. However, a minority – estimated at one-quarter of all Doukhobor men and women eligible for the draft – discarded their religious and philosophical objections to war and, for a variety of personal reasons, entered active military service. Without glorifying war, or calling into question the faith and convictions of those who served, it is a chapter of our Doukhobor history which deserves to be better documented. It is the intention of this project to compile as complete a list as possible of those men and women of Doukhobor ancestry who enlisted and served in the Canadian Forces during World War II. Learn about the project, its current status, and how you can contribute. http://www.doukhobor.org/WWII-Project.htm

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Partial Index of Doukhobors in the WWII Canadian Forces, 1939-1945
New! This partial index contains the full name, address, force and service comments for 213 (to-date) Doukhobor service men and women in the Canadian forces between 1939 and 1945. Compiled from various sources, this is a work in progress. http://www.doukhobor.org/WWII.pdf

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Doukhobor Cemetery Transcriptions
The following Doukhobor cemeteries and burial sites have been transcribed and are now online. Learn about their location, history, physical layout, driving directions and details with respect to burials:

Shoreacres Cemetery – Shoreacres, BC http://www.doukhobor.org/Cemetery-Prekrasnoe.htm
Hilliers Doukhobor Cemetery – Hilliers, BC http://www.doukhobor.org/Cemetery-Hilliers.htm

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Doukhobor Historical Maps
The following detailed historical maps have been specifically developed for Doukhobor genealogical study and historical research. They can be used to locate settlements and geographic features, identify changing place names and political boundaries, and understand migration routes and settlement patterns:

Early Doukhobor Exiles in Russia, 1762-1802 http://www.doukhobor.org/Exile-Russia.gif
Doukhobors in Russia, 1802 http://www.doukhobor.org/Russia-1801.gif
Doukhobor Resettlement to Tavria, 1802-1822 http://www.doukhobor.org/Resettlement-Tavria.GIF
Doukhobor Exile to the Caucasus, 1841-1845 http://www.doukhobor.org/Exile-Caucasus.gif

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Blahoslovenie Creek Commemorates Kylemore Doukhobors
A creek near Kylemore, Saskatchewan has been officially named to commemorate the Doukhobor settlers of the area. Read this Press Release to learn more about how Blahoslovenie Creek, the name proposed by Jonathan J. Kalmakoff, was officially approved by the Saskatchewan Geographic Names Board. http://www.doukhobor.org/Blahoslovenie-Creek.htm

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Frequency of Doukhobor Names in Saskatchewan in 1905
A study of the frequency of names offers important insights into Doukhobor genealogy, history and culture. The frequency of a name is the number of times it occurs relative to the total name instances sampled. This study presents data on the frequency of men’s names, women’s names and surnames found among the Doukhobors in Saskatchewan in 1905. The study shows the popularity and variety of personal names at this time. It also shows the absolute and relative size of families bearing a particular surname. Overall, this study allows us to form a detailed and accurate understanding of the use of names by Doukhobors shortly after their arrival in Canada from Russia. Compiled by Jonathan J. Kalmakoff. http://www.doukhobor.org/Frequency-Names.htm

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Doukhobor Interfaith Relations in South Ukraine, Late 18th & Early 19th Century
While residing in Tavria in the early nineteenth century, the Doukhobors invariably came in contact with members of other religious creeds, notably Orthodox, Mennonites, Molokans and Muslims. In this Doukhobor Genealogy Website exclusive, Anastasia Buchna, a Postgraduate of the State University of Zaporozhia in Ukraine, explores the influence of inter-creed relations on the belief system and socioeconomic life of the Doukhobors, based on archival records from the State Archives of Crimea and other Russian and Ukrainian language sources. Translated from the original Ukrainian by Natalia V. Bagniouk with further translation and editing by Jonathan J. Kalmakoff. Published by permission. http://www.doukhobor.org/Buchna.htm

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Conversation Between the Rector of Alexander Nevsky Seminary and Kharkov Dukhobortsy, 1792
In 1792, a delegation of three Doukhobors from Kharkov – Mikhail Shchirev, Anikei and Timofey Sukharev – was sent to the Governor-General of that province, ostensibly to petition for protection from persecution and harassment by local authorities, clergy and their Orthodox neighbours. They were summarily arrested and sent to the Alexander Nevsky Seminary in St. Petersburg. There they were admonished and persuaded to recant their faith, to no avail. The following is a record of their “conversation” with the rector of the seminary, Archimandrite Innokenty (Dubravitsky), contained in a May 12, 1792 letter from Gavriil (Petrov), Metropolitan of Novgorod and St. Petersburg to the Governor-General of Kharkov. This invaluable historic material contains one of the earliest recorded accounts of the Doukhobor religious doctrine. Reproduced from Robert Pinkerton, “Russia: or, Miscellaneous Observations on the Past and Present State of that Country and its Inhabitants” (London: Seeley and Sons, 1833). http://www.doukhobor.org/Archimandrite.htm

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My Rejection of Military Services – Letters from the Peasant Petr Vasilyevich Olkhovik
The 1880’s and 1890’s saw a surge of pacifist sectarianism among Christian groups in Russia. Historic accounts of this period exist, especially in relation to the Doukhobors, who refused military service en masse in 1895. However, there are relatively few accounts of members of other Spiritual Christian faiths who, inspired by Tolstoy and the example of the Doukhobors, similarly refused to bear arms in the name of Christ’s teachings. One of the most eloquent and informative of these are the letters of the peasant Petr Vasilyevich Olkhovik, which contain a first-person account of his rejection of military service and subsequent arrest, imprisonment and exile by Tsarist authorities. His letters were originally published in 1897 by the Tolstoyan Vladimir Grigoryevich Chertkov as "Pis'ma Petra Vasilyevicha Olkhovika, Krest'yanina Kharkovskoy Gubernii, Otkazavashchagosya ot' Voinskoi Povinnosti v 1895 Gody" (London, 1897). One hundred and ten years later, this rare historic manuscript is made available for the first time in English translation in this Doukhobor Genealogy Website exclusive. Translated from the original Russian by Jack McIntosh. Foreword and Afterword by Jonathan J. Kalmakoff. http://www.doukhobor.org/Olkhovik.htm

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Wives and Children of the Doukhobors
Doctor Prokopy Nestorovich Sokolnikov (1865-1917) was a Yakut-born physician who graduated from Tomsk University and desired to return to serve in his homeland. On his way to Yakutsk, at the request of his friend and colleague Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy, he accompanied a party of forty-one Doukhobors (25 women, 15 children and one elderly man) from the Caucasus, providing them with medical assistance throughout the journey and making arrangements with administrative authorities in regard to their needs. Thanks to Sokolnikov’s assistance, the Doukhobors were safely delivered to Yakutsk, where they reunited with their husbands and fathers who were exiled there for their rejection of military service. Throughout the 11,000-verst journey, the Tolstoyan doctor kept a diary in which he recorded vivid, often moving, impressions of his experiences. His diary was originally published in 1899 in the Irkutsk newspaper "Vostochnoe Obozrenie". In 2001, it was reproduced in the Russian monthly "Ilin". The English translation of this valuable historical material is reproduced by permission from ISKRA Nos. 1945-1951 (Grand Forks, U.S.C.C., August-December, 2003). http://www.doukhobor.org/Sokolnikov.htm

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Personal Experiences Among the Doukhobors in Canada
Joseph Elkinton (1859-1920) was a prominent Philadelphia Quaker who, together with his father Joseph S. Elkinton (1830-1905), was instrumental in organizing and providing material assistance from the Society of Friends in the United States to the Doukhobors during their immigration and settlement in Canada. In the summer of 1902, Elkinton visited several Doukhobor villages in the Prince Albert and Yorkton districts and came to know the people and their surroundings quite intimately. His observations were published in the book "The Doukhobors: Their History in Russia, Their Migration to Canada" (Philadelphia: Ferris & Leach, 1903). The following excerpt, taken from Chapter One of his book, is a vivid and moving account of his travels among the Doukhobors and the hospitality and kindness of heart which he encountered. http://www.doukhobor.org/Elkinton.htm

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A Day with the Doukhobors
On February 20, 1902, a traveller from Winnipeg, Manitoba, identified by the initials "J.R.", accompanied an immigration officer from Rosthern to the Doukhobor village of Terpenie near the North Saskatchewan River. His personal experiences, observations and impressions were subsequently published in the Manitoba Morning Free Press on March 1, 1902. With superb imagery and evocative detail, the traveler describes the Doukhobors’ history, prosperity and progress, observance of Canadian law, courtesy and customs, meals, dress and industry, music, as well as their village, homes, interiors, stables and bathhouses. In doing so, he provides the reader with a rare and fascinating first-hand account, from an impartial, outside perspective, of the Doukhobors shortly after their arrival in Canada. http://www.doukhobor.org/Day-Doukhobors.htm

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Doukhobor Architecture: An Introduction
When Russian Doukhobors emigrated to Canada, they brought ideological and folk life traditions that generated the distinctive character of their architecture. The following article by F. Mark Mealing Ph.D., adapted and reproduced by permission from Canadian Ethnic Studies (XVI, 3, 84), describes and comments upon the five distinctive periods of architectural forms of which we have a record: Russian, Saskatchewan Community Village, British Columbia Communal Structures, Transition and Present. The earlier forms are characterized by Plain ornamental style and communally-oriented function; the recent forms reflect, in their variety, the impact of social forces including internal division and external pressures of politics, economics and acculturation. http://www.doukhobor.org/Architecture.htm

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Visit to the Doukhobors
The year 1902 was a turbulent one for the Doukhobors in Canada. Disputes with government over homestead entry, internal dissension and zealot activity turned the tide of public opinion against them, prompting many wildly outrageous and grossly exaggerated reports. Despite this, some fair-minded Canadians continued to stand up unreservedly for the Doukhobors. One such citizen, E.H. Blow of Fort Pelly, Assiniboia, wrote a detailed and sympathetic account of the Doukhobors of the North Colony, extolling their prosperity and progress, social customs, skills, industry, work ethic, and charity, homes, buildings and yards, and other positive characteristics. Published in the Manitoba Morning Free Press on October 1, 1902, his message was simple and direct: Leave the Doukhobors alone. Give them a chance, and let them become Canadians on their own terms. http://www.doukhobor.org/Visit-Doukhobors.htm

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1904 Report of the General Meeting of the Doukhobor Community
During the first decades of the twentieth century, the Christian Community of Universal Brotherhood was governed by general meetings that were held early each year to receive the annual report and financial statement prepared by the representative committee and to vote on various matters of policy and practice brought before them. These gatherings were typically attended by two delegates from each village, the administrators in charge of community affairs and the leader Peter “Lordly” Verigin. The following is a rare extant report of the general meeting of the Doukhobor Community held at Nadezhda village, Saskatchewan, on February 28, 1904, as published in the Yorkton Enterprise, Vol. 8, No. 16, April 21, 1904. The minutes provide extraordinary insight into the administrative matters of the day, including the naturalization question, financial assistance to the Yakutsk exiles, the need for a Quaker-sponsored school, establishment of a brickworks and large warehouse near the C.P.R, the use of steam-powered agricultural machinery, the necessity of tea and sugar in the diet, and various capital expenditures. In addition, the general account leaves no doubt of the extent of the material growth of the Community under Verigin’s leadership, one year after his arrival from exile in Siberia. http://www.doukhobor.org/Report-1904.htm

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Early Doukhobor Experience on the Canadian Prairies
The prairie frontier is usually seen as an open society. Yet as historian and scholar Jeremy Adelman contends, the settlement of over 7,000 Doukhobors asks us seriously to challenge this view. Despite an agreement between Dominion authorities and Doukhobor leaders to respect the claims of the refugees regarding the pattern of land tenure, protection was slowly rescinded. Under pressure from non-Doukhobor settlers and fueled by the conviction that independent ownership by male homesteaders was the best way to effect colonization of the west, the government withdrew land from the Doukhobor reserves. In response, Doukhobors who wanted to preserve community-based proprietorship fled the prairies. In the following article, reproduced by permission from Canadian Ethnic Studies (1990-91, Vol 25, No. 4), Adelman redresses the view that Canada's first attempt at coordinated refugee settlement ended in failure because of the "fanaticism" and "zealotry" of the Doukhobors; rather it was a disaster, largely due to cultural insensitivity. http://www.doukhobor.org/Adelman.htm

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1906 Report of the General Meeting of the Doukhobor Community
During the first decades of the twentieth century, the Christian Community of Universal Brotherhood was governed by general meetings that were held early each year to receive the annual report and financial statement prepared by the representative committee and to vote on various matters of policy and practice brought before them. These gatherings were typically attended by two delegates from each village, the administrators in charge of community affairs and the leader Peter “Lordly” Verigin. The following is a rare extant report of the general meeting of the Doukhobor Community held at Nadezhda village, Saskatchewan, on February 16, 1906, as published in the Manitoba Morning Free Press, Wednesday, April 25, 1906. The minutes provide extraordinary insight into the administrative matters of the day, including the role of women in the Community and their participation in general meetings, immigration assistance to the Yakutsk exiles, the leader’s interpretation of a Doukhobor psalm, the treatment of animals, need for a hospital, and capital expenditures. In addition, the general account leaves no doubt of the extent of the material achievements of the Community under Verigin’s leadership at this time. http://www.doukhobor.org/Report-1906.htm

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The (Almost) Quiet Revolution: Doukhobor Schooling in Saskatchewan
In British Columbia the long and often violent conflict between the Sons of Freedom and the British Columbia government over schooling diverted attention from the fact that developments among the Doukhobors who lived elsewhere did not parallel those of the Pacific province. The subject of this article by John Lyons, reproduced by permission from Canadian Ethnic Studies (1976, Vol 8, No. 1), is the provision of public education for Saskatchewan Doukhobors. It deals only in passing with the Doukhobors early educational experiences in the old Northwest Territories and the attempts to provide private schools for them; but rather it concentrates rather on the period after Saskatchewan became a province in 1905. After surveying some aspects of provincial school policies, the article deals with each of the three Doukhobor sub-sects, the impact of these policies on them and the circumstances surrounding their eventual acceptance of public schooling. http://www.doukhobor.org/Lyons.htm

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Molokan Immigration Via Canada
Between 1904 and 1912, over 3,500 Molokans emigrated from the Caucasus region of Russia to the United States. The majority of the Russian sectarian immigrants arrived through the main American immigration ports of Ellis Island, New York and Galveston, Texas. However, recent archival discoveries confirm that approximately two hundred Molokan immigrants - over five per-cent of all Molokans who joined the migration - arrived through east Canadian ports between 1904 and 1907, then journeyed overland by rail through Canada before turning stateside on the final leg of their journey to their destination in Los Angeles, California. The following is an index of known Canadian ship passenger records and border crossing records containing Molokan immigrants. Compiled by Jonathan J. Kalmakoff. http://www.doukhobor.org/Molokan-Immigration.htm

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Doukhobors in Georgia
This working paper by Hedvig Lohm studies the issue of land ownership and inter-ethnic relations among the Doukhobors, Armenians and Georgians of Ninotsminda rayon (district), in the Samtskhe-Javakheti region of Georgia. Its findings, based on fact-finding fieldwork mission conducted in August, September and October 2006 in the Ninotsminda rayon, along with over 70 interviews with local inhabitants, authorities and other related parties, provides one of the most thorough and comprehensive synopsis of the Georgian Doukhobors today. http://www.ecmi.de/download/working_paper_35_en.pdf

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Links
A number of new links have been added to interesting and useful websites, including: Encyclopedia of Saskatchewan; Albertasource.com: Alberta’s Online Encyclopedia; Encyclopedia of British Columbia; Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online; Culture.ca; Dukhobor.ru (a new Russian Doukhobor website); and more! http://www.doukhobor.org/links.html

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Publications
Copies of the following genealogical reference books by Jonathan J. Kalmakoff are available for sale: 1853 Tax Register of Doukhobors in the Caucasus; 1918 Independent Doukhobor Census; and 1930 Names Doukhobors of Canada, Saskatchewan Membership List. Coming soon: Doukhobor Ship Passenger Lists (2nd Edition); and Doukhobors in the 1911 Canada Census. For more information, visit the following link: http://www.doukhobor.org/sources.html#Publications.

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Jonathan J. Kalmakoff

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