Search for content in message boards

Elmer Yancey, King Co., TX

Replies: 0

Elmer Yancey, King Co., TX

Posted: 965217600000
Classification: Biography
Edited: 993660261000
ELMER YANCEY FAMILY
Source: King County - Windmills & Barbed Wire. By the King County [Texas] Historical Society.
There is a large farm on the north side of the Pitchfork Ranch where several families make their homes. It appears to be a small village when one approaches the clusters of houses, barns, graineries and at the present time tall grain elevators.
The Elmer Yancey family moved to this Pitchfork farm in 1923 from Ada, Oklahoma. Mr. Yancey had a friend, Mr. Homer Williams, who had moved to King County earlier, and perhaps through this friend's encouragement decided to move here. Mr. Yancey drove his car to King County and located work and made arrangements for his family to join him here. Mrs. Yancey and the five children came on the train to Estelline, Texas where their father met them. The trip from Ada, Oklahoma took two or three days with stops along the way at the many small towns.
Ettie May Yancey, who is now Mrs. Vastine Goodwin, remembers especially the train ride and a stop in El Reno, Oklahoma. As it was a place where several passengers got off and others were boarding the train, the stop was longer than usual. Ettie Mae decided to take advantage of this break for a chance to another car of the train, for an adventure. When the train started her mother missed her and asked the conductor to stop the train, thinking Ettie Mae had been left in E1 Reno. A search was begun for the missing girl and when she was found about three cars away from where her family had been riding, she was having a good time visiting with some new friends she had made.
The family soon settled in their new home and the children enrolled in the Gardner School. People often called this school "Gardner Flat."
In 1924 Miss Erna Mae Overstreet, the teacher at Gardner, boarded at the Yancey home. She always wore pretty clothes which the pupils admired. When an opportunity presented itself for Ettie Mae to try on a pair of the teacher's silk hose, she decided to wear them just once. She was shocked when she took them off and found them in shreds. Silk hose were fragile in those days and had none of the wearing qualities of the modern day nylons. She hated to let the teacher know of her ruining. the hose so much, she decided not to mention it. After she disposed of them, she never "borrowed" any more silk hose from Miss Overstreet.
Another memory concerning the teacher was how cold her feet would be when she came in from a date at night in the winter time. Since Ettie Mae shared the bedroom and slept with her, very often the nice warm spot went to the teacher, because one touch of the icy cold feet made Ettie Mae move quickly out of her warm place.
The Yancey children walked to school at Gardner - perhaps a mile and a half. A new building in 1929 at this school replaced the old one. More families had moved in so two teachers were employed. Mr. and Mrs. Ben Overstreet were the teachers in 1929.
Some of the other families living near the school or attending school there were the Flipping, Breitlings and Morris.
The Yancey family moved to Finney in 1932 and lived on Starr land where cotton was the main crop. In 1935, they moved to Roswell, New Mexico to make their home.
This family had seven children. The four girls are Ettie Mae (Mrs. Vastine Goodwin), Faye, Pauline and Louise. The three boys are Orvil W., Harvey Lee and Elmer Jr., all deceased.

Find a board about a specific topic