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Rev. Joseph Thomas, New Valley, 1765-1786

Replies: 21

Re: Rev. Joseph Thomas, New Valley, 1765-1786

Posted: 1523905685000
Classification: Query
Edited: 1523906372000
i bought a book several years ago entitled, "The Johns Connections "by Helen Sides Dye, with references to Ayer, Browder, Calwalder, Davis, Edwards, Emanuel, Evans, Griffith, Harry, Hughes, Humphrey, James, Janeway, Jenkins, John, Jones, Lewis, Loftin, Lovelace, Miles, Moore, Morgan, Nunn, Oliver, Owen, Prichard, Pouncey, Rhys ( Rhees ), Rice, Richards, Roberts, Rogers, Sides (Seitz), Thomas, Townsend, Welsh Wild, Williams, Wilson, Woodley, and many other related families.

By Helen Sides Dye
Copyright 1999
Heritage Books, Inc
1540E Pointer Ridge Place
Bowie, Maryland 20716
1-800- 398-7709
htpp://heritagebooks.com

ISBN: O-7884-1218-3

I haven't been able to follow my lines because of the Welsh naming pattern in that book.

I have these records:
The following is the research of ELMYRA ROYSE nee ELMYRA McGUIRE. She donated her papers to the Oklahoma Genelogical Society by her son after her death. Her reserch report includes the following:

" Since many who settled on South Fork of Holston had the same names as earlier residents of Loudoun County, Virginia, I am interested in that area. A WILLIAM LEWIS and a WILLIAM LEWIS, JR. ., appeared on the tax lists of Loudoun County in 1766; in that same vicinity were JOHN and WiILLIAM GRIFFITH, WILLIAM, JAMES, and JOSHUA JONES, BENJAMIN, and THOMAS JOHN, JOHN THOMAS; and other "interesting names."

" The will of WILLIAM JONES of Loudoun County, 1771, named wife MARY devised land to sons JOSHUA and JAMES adjoining the DEHAVEN'S and a negro to daughter MARY GRIFFITH, and mentioned the Baptist Meeting House adjoining his plantation of which JOSEPH THOMAS was minister and WILLIAM LEWIS and THOMAS GEORGE were elders. The will was witnessed by JOSIAS CLAPHAM, WILLIAM LEWIS, and SARAH GRIFFITH. (This was probably New Valley in Pennsylvania; the members included emigrants from Pennsylvania and converts in Virginia.)

"On 9 March 1774 in Southwest Virginia "our" WILLIAM LEWIS and a JOHN THOMAS had adjoining tracts surveyed; on May 15, 1775, "our" GRIFFITH LEWIS and a JOSHUA JONES had tracts surveyed - corner to each other. These were part of the Loyal Company Grant and was located on South Fork of Holston. In 1782, JOHN THOMAS, THOMAS JOHN, and BENJAMIN JOHN were taxed in same district in Washington County, Virginia as were "our" WILLIAM LEWIS and his sons; in 1784 JOHN THOMAS witnessed the will of WILLIAM LEWIS."

"On September 21, 1798, BENJAMIN JOHN and wife LYDIA, Washington County, Virginia deeded to THOMAS PIERCE of Wythe County, Virginia, an iron ore bank on South Fork of Holston; in a law suit of 1807 - PIERCEvs. RAZOR - it was stated that the iron works had been owned by JOSHUA JONES, PETER RAZOR, and BENJAMIN JOHN. "

" On 9 March 1774 in southwest Virginia "our" William LEWIS and a JOHN THOMAS had adjoining tracts surveyed; on 15 May 1775 "our" GRIFFITH LEWIS and a JOSHUA JONES had tracts surveyed - corner to each other . These were part of the Loyal Company Grant and was located on South Fork of Holston."

"In 1782, JOHN THOMAS, THOMAS JOHN, and BENJAMIN JOHN were taxed in same district in Washington Co., VA as were "our" WILLIAM LEWIS and his sons; in 1784 JOHN THOMAS witnessed the will of WILLIAM LEWIS. "

9 April 1770 RcCt: Bk.Pg. G, 246, 247
Farmer JOHN TODHUNTER & wife MARGARET of Ldn to farmer WILLIAM JONES of Ldn Lease/release of 450 acres adj ABRAHAM DEHAVENS, JOSIAS CLAPHAM.
Wit; JOSIAS CLAPHAM, JOS. THOMAS , JOHN STEERE

9 March 1777, Bk. , Pg. L, 212-213
JAMES JONES & wife MARY of Ldn to GEORGE RAZOR of Ldn. Lease/release of 186 acres ( bequeath to JONES by his father WILLIAM JONES ) adj JOHN TODHUNTER, WILLIAM WOOLARD,
Wit: WILLIAM BEAVERS, WILLIAM CAVINS, LEONARD ANSELL, CRAVEN PEYTON


" On 21 September 1798, BENJAMIN JOHN and wife LYDIA, Washington Co., VA deeded to THOMAS PIERCE of Wythe Co., VA, an iron ore bank on South Fork of Holston; in a law suit of 1807 - PIERCE vs. RAZOR - it was stated that the iron works had been owned by JOSHUA JONES, PETER RAZOR and BENJAMIN JOHN."


" WILLIAM LEWIS was living in Southwest Virginia on the South Fork of the Holston River when this area was a part of Fincastle County. The dateof his settlement has not been found nor the date when he became a landowner. The following has been abstracted from the original surveys in Fincastle Co. Record of Plotts, Book A. Page 23 - Surveyed for WILLIAM LEWIS by virtue of the Order of Council made 16 December 1773, and as part of the Loyal Company Grant,the annexed fiqure of land lying in Fincastle Co. on the South fork of Holston, containing 176 acres and bounded as follows.....adjoining JOHN THOMAS and HENRY BOWEN."
Surveyed 9 March1774. (On same date, for HENRY BOWEN, 426 acres, part of Loyal Co. Grant, South Fork of Holston and for JOHN THOMAS, 404 acres, part of Loyal Co. Grant, South Fork of Holston; both tracts "corner to WILLIAM LEWIS".)


"-Surveyed 16 May, 1775 for WILLIAM LEWIS - part of Loyal Company Grant-lying in Fincastle Co. -Southwest side of South Fork of Holston -containing 204 acres - beginning at bank of two-mile creek."

"The Holston River was formerly called Indian River, and settlers were in this area long before the above surveys were made. When Fincastle County was discontinued late in 1775, this section became Washington County; and I believe the area where WiILIAM LEWIS lived was later set off to Smyth County.

Since no deeds disposing of the above land have been found, no patent was ever issued to WILLIAM LEWIS, and no land was mentioned in his will, it is the opinion of the VirginiaState Library that he assigned it to someone, in which case the patent would be recorded under the assignee's name. The assignment made by GRIFFITH LEWIS, oldest son of WILLIAM, was located through a manuscript called "List of Loyal Company Plats, Certificates, and Surveys, 1799-1815; but "the column in which the recordation was to be entered was blank for both of the WILLIAM LEWIS surveys, nor was there any notation of recordation on either of the original surveys."



Pierce vs. Razor--O. S. 157; N. S. 55--Bill, December, 1807.
Complainants are, viz: George, Moses, Aaron, Isaac Pierce; Seth
Hendrick (?), and Mary, his wife; Ezra, Thomas, Hanna Pierce, last
three being infants (by Hepsaba, their mother and next friend).
Joshua Jones, Peter Razor and Benj. John owned iron works in Wythe
County, and on 12th April, 1794, sold to father of orators and
oratrixes. Joshua Jones left the commonwealth. He had sold to James
Dougherty, who died, and same descended to his son Daniel. Peter
Razor has died, leaving widow Anna, and children, viz: Edward
Calehan (?) and his wife; John, Ann, Christy, Daniel and Christina
Razor. Deed 21st September, 1798, by Benjamin John and Lydia, of
Washington County, to Thomas Pierce of Wythe County, an iron ore
bank on South Fork Holstein River. Proved in Washington County,
21st September, 1798.

This was ... 21 Sep 1798, BENJAMIN JOHN and wife LYDIA , Washington Co., Va. deededd to THOMAS PIERCE of Wythe Co., Va. an iron ore on South Fork of Holston; in a law suit of 1807.. PIERCE vs RAZOR.. it was stated that the iron works had been owned by JOSHUA JONES, PETER RAZOR and BENJAMIN JOHN.


It should be noted that in March 1777 in Book: Pg. L:212, 213 Dated 9 march 1777 and RcCT 10 March 1777 JAMES JONES and wife MARY of Loudoun County, Virginia to GEORGE RAZOR of Loudoun. Lease/Release of 186 a ( bequeath to JONES by his father WILLIAM JONES ) adj JOHN TODHUNTER, WILLIAM WOODWARD.
Wit: WILLIAM BEAVERS, WILLIAM CAVINS, LEONARD ANSELL, CRAVEN PEYTON.

The 1771 will of William JONES of Loudoun Co. named wife Mary, devised land to sons Joshua and James adjoining the DEHAVEN's and a negro to daughter Mary GRIFFITH, and mentioned the Baptist Meeting House adjoining his plantation of which Joseph THOMAS was minister and William LEWIS and Thomas GEORGE were elders. The will was witnessed by Josias CLAPHAM, William LEWIS, and Sarah GRIFFITH. (This was probably New Valley in Pennsylvania; the members included emigrants from Pennsylvania and converts in Virginia.)

On 9 March 1774 in southwest Virginia "our" William LEWIS and a John THOMAS had adjoining tracts surveyed; on 15 May 1775 "our" Griffith LEWIS and a Joshua JONES had tracts surveyed - corner to each other . These were part of the Loyal Company Grant and was located on South Fork of Holston.

In 1782, John THOMAS, Thomas JOHN, and Benjamin JOHN were taxed in same district in Washington Co., VA as were "our" William LEWIS and his sons; in 1784 John THOMAS witnessed the will of William LEWIS.

On 21 September 1798, Benjamin JOHN and wife Lydia, Washington Co., V A deeded to Thomas PIERCE of Wythe Co., VA, an iron ore bank on South Fork of Holston; in a law suit of 1807 - Pierce vs. Razor - it was stated that the iron works had been owned by Joshua JONES, Peter RAZOR and Benjamin JOHN.

From the 1758-1781 Loudoun Co Tithables by the Sparacios:
--------
Johns, Thos.' tithables, Susannah Bennett - 1 tithable; List taken by Jas. Hamilton for 1760
John, Thomas; Bengiman John - 2 tithables, 141 acres; Phil. Noland's list for 1766
John, Thomas for self and John, Benjamin - 2 tithables; land 141 acres; Colo. James Hamilton's Tithables 1767
John, Thos.; John, Ben. - 2 tithables; List of tithables taken by Josias Clapham, Gent. & returned Oct 1768.

Bk:Pg: L:317, 318 Date: 11 Oct 1775 Returned to court: 8 Apr 1776Martha JOHN (wd/o Thomas JOHN dec'd) and Benjamin JOHN & wife Lydia of Ldn to Joseph COLEMAN of Ldn. Lease/release of 141ac in Shelburne Parish adj Robert POPKINS. Wit: Thomas GEORGE, John STEERE, John TODHUNTER. - "Index to Loudoun Co Deed Books A-Z" by Pat Duncan

Bk:Pg: I:034, 036 Date: 17 Jun 1770 Returned to court: 14 May 1771John POPKINS of Ldn to Benjamin JOHN of Ldn. Lease/release of 141ac nr Main Road adj Evan RICE, Thompson MASON, Robt. POPKINS. Wit: Robert HAMILTON, Stephen EMREY, William LEWIS, Joseph JENNY. - "Index to Loudoun Co Deed Books A-Z" by Pat Duncan

NEWVALLEY - [Regular][Baptist] Loudoun County, Virginia:
So distinguished from a part of the county of the same name, in Shelburn Parish, Lowden [Loudon] country, 200 miles NW from Williamsburg, and 180 SSW from Philadelphia. The place of worship is 26 feet by 20, built in 1768, on land given by Wm Jones. Ruling Elders and laying on of hands admitted. No estate nor salary except presents and perquisites to the amount of, perhaps, 30 pounds. The families about 90 where of 40 [35 lined out] persons are baptized and in communion, here administered the 2n Lords-day in the month. The minister is Rev. Joseph Thomas who has to his assistant Mr. Thomas Betty. This their present situation.

They originated in this manner. About the year 1763 one William Lewis from the Great Valley in Pennsylvania, settled in the neighborhood. In 1764 [2 years after ? for Thomas from Newbritain settled in these parts] Rev. Joseph Thomas came and settled in the same neighborhood. He soon set up a meeting and baptized one Richard Williams, John Thomas and wife, Benj. John, Mary George, Eleanor George and William George, James Jones. These nine [8] persons were, Jul. 18, 1767, constituted into a distinct church. No remarkable event since. Their first Minister is the present:

.Rev. Joseph Thomas
He was born, Mar. 13, 1718, in Pembrokshire, in Wales. Came to America in 1721, and settled at Hilltown in Pennsylvania. [Baptized in 1731 by Benj. Griffiths.] Ordained at Newbrittain in 1766. Came to Virginia in 1765, and the year following took the care of the church. He married Martha Lewis by whom he has children Rachel, Lydia, Enoch, Martha.

Chestnut Hill home of Loudoun County, Virginia. In talking about the home they also talk about the New Valley meeting house and members of the New Valley Baptist church. It is believed the Chestnut Hill home in Loudoun County, Virginia was originaly built by Thomas George. Thomas George is not listed in the New Valley Baptist church history, but it is believed that his children, Mary George, Eleanor George and William George are listed in that history.

July 18 1767 - One of nine organizing members of newly formed New Valley Baptist church in Loudoun County, Virginia. William Lewis & Benjamin John/s also new members of this newly formed New Valley Baptist church. - John Thomas & wife are Baptized by Rev. Joseph Thomas.

"The Great Awakening During a period of religious resurgence, termed "The Great Awakening" by historians, many Pennsylvanians emigrated to the region in search of land to farm in an area where they could worship according to their own beliefs. Historians frequently acknowledge the immigration of the Quakers to Waterford, the Scotch-Irish to the Irish Corner, and the Pennsylvania Germans to Lovettsville. Another group, the English Baptists, also followed the paths from Pennsylvania through Maryland to northern Loudoun County. Many Baptists organized to move to northern Loudoun, and once here, they built a meeting house called New Valley on land belonging to William Jones. In 1767, the church was constituted as a branch of the Ketocton Baptist Association. Their spiritual leader was Joseph Thomas, who along with David Thomas, had organized the Little River Meeting. Joseph Thomas was born in Wales and immigrated to America and Berks County, Pennsylvania with his family. He was from Great Valley in Pennsylvania, and it is supposed that is how New Valley derived its name. Thomas was not known as a powerful speaker and church attendance dropped. The church was represented at Association meetings until 1778; however, there was no representation again until 1793, when only 13 members were listed on the church rolls. By 1805, attendance was increasing. Thomas died intestate, but his possessions, which were probated in May 1786 included a desk and library of books, evidencing an education. New Valley Baptist Meeting House, currently a residence, is located on the New Valley Church road west of Lucketts. A cemetery sits in a wooded area near the stone structure. The earliest gravestone identified was erected for Samuel Sinclair after his death on May 17, 1806, yet the second earliest gravestone identified wasn't erected until 1830, with most of the stones dating from the 1840s to 1880s. It is possible that this was not the original New Valley Baptist Meeting House structure or location, because William Jones, who donated the land at his death in 1771 never owned this parcel. William Jones, a Baptist from Pennsylvania, and his wife, Mary, had at least three children; James, Joshua, and Mary. It has been suggested that William Jones was born in Wales, England and that his son Joshua was born in Bucks County, PA. Joshua married Hannah Todhunter of Chester, PA on 7 July 1767 in Loudoun County. Perhaps their marriage was one of the first weddings to be held in the recently established New Valley Meeting House. Jones, whose occupation was farmer, may have immigrated to Loudoun County as early as 1759, when a William Jones is listed in the Tithables. His son, Joshua, was a tanner. For a brief period of three years, John Trammell owned many of the Sinclair family tracts of land. He subsequently sold the land to William Jones, who acquired seven tracts of land from 1761 to 1770 totaling over 1,430 acres. Most of the tracts were purchased in 1761. In 1762, Jones was granted a patent for 136 acres of land 2 miles south the tract of land that would one day be called Chestnut Hill. Jones was still living on the patented tract at his death. In his will he states that he "leaves to his loving Wife the use of the plantation I live on?" In contrast with the Quakers, William Jones, was also a slave owner. He also bequeaths to his wife, after bequeathing three cows and before bequeathing half of his hogs, "a Negro Wench" and "a Servant Man Calld Rowland." In addition to devising land to his two sons, Jones bequeaths his brass kettle and wearing apparel to Joshua and his watch to James. To Joseph Thomas, Minister and William Lewis and Thomas George, elders of New Valley Meeting, he bequeaths "a piece of land containing 1-1/2 acres whereon the baptist Meeting House is Built. Joyning this Plantation." Another Pennsylvanian who likely was a member of the New Valley Meeting was Leonard Ansell. He purchased land from William Jones paying with Pennsylvanian currency. His daughter, Margaret Fry, was buried in the New Valley Meeting House cemetery. One year before his death, Jones sold 519 acres to fellow New Valley Meeting church elder Thomas George, though evidence suggests that George had established a tenant farm on the property several years earlier. George Leasehold & Ownership (ca. 1766-1779) It is hypothesized that Thomas George built a stucco-covered two-story stone house ca. 1766 prior to purchasing the land. This building, comprising the earliest section of the current Chestnut Hill home, exhibits the character of a 1760s Pennsylvania-German house. Items listed in George's probate inventory suggest he may have been a carpenter and cooper. Included were "Seven Augers, Three Saws, One Adz and three Axes, one set of Cooper Tools, Sundry Files, four Gauges and twelve Chizels, One Glue Pot with several Pools, Two drawing knives, two Hammers, eleven plains, cross cut-saw and froe, coopers hoops and rake." The inventory also lists three additional slaves, Frank, Halis, and Pat. The inventory suggests that Thomas George, or his grown son, William George who was living with him at the time, may have been personally involved in the construction of the Chestnut Hill home and provides a record of what tools may have been used to build the house. Elder George held the land for 9 1/2 years before he sold 200 acres, including, presumably, the stone house, to Josias Clapham in 1779. George's will, written in 1787 and proved in 1798, left one guinea to his son, William, and devised to his three sons-in-laws, brothers Isaac, John and Joseph Steers, the slaves and the remainder of his estate. George provides another example of a pious Baptist owning slaves. He owned a "negro Wench Nan & her son Oliver" and "a negro Girl named Dina" and a "negro girl called fanny." Fifty years later, the property was still being called "The George Tract" in addition to the Chestnut Hill name."

The New Britain people were desirous of becoming a separate church, and improved this opportunity for action in that direction. Twenty-two of their number - Isaac Evans, David Stephens, Evan Stephens Jr., John Williams, Walter Shewell, Joshua Jones, William George, Clement Doyle, William Dungan, John James, David Morgan, Thomas James, David Stephens Jr., Thomas Humphreys, Mary James, Mary Shewell, Margaret Phillips, Elizabeth Stephens, Jane James, Catherine Evans, Margaret Doyle - associated themselves together November 28, 1754, and became the original constituent members of the New Britain Baptist church by attaching their signatures to a written instrument setting forth their belief and objects of thus organizing. The leaders in this movement were Benjamin Griffith, William Davis, Isaac Eaton, and John Thomas. An arrangement was made by which the Montgomery church dismissed the new organization, and in 1755 the latter was received into the Philadelphia Association. And thus the ninth Baptist church in the state, with respect to seniority, came into existence.


The following is an early history of the Baptist Church in Loudoun County, Virginia, "NEWVALLEY" - Regular - Baptist Congregation. A John Thomas, William Lewis and a Benjamin John/s are all early members of this congregation and can be found later in Washington/Smyth County, Virginia. The Richard Williams in the following document has a son that moves to Wythe/Smyth County, Virginia. The James Jones in the following document is the son of William Jones. James Jones has a brother, Joshua Jones, that moves to Wythe/Smyth County, Virginia. Note the "John Thomas and wife" in the following document.

March 9, 1774 - Land surveyed - obtained 404 Acres - North side of South Folk of Holston River Sinclair's / St. Clair's Bottom, Virginia. - Adjoining Neighbor, William Lewis' land was also surveyed the same date.
WILLIAM LEWIS (Additional Info from Dr. Cohen Lewis):
William Lewis was living in southwest Virginia on the South Fork of the Holston River when this area was a part of Fincastle County. The date of his settlement has not been found nor the date when he became a landowner.

From the original surveys in Fincastle County Record of Plotts, Book A:
p. 23 - surveyed for Wm Lewis by virtue of the Order of Council made 16 Dec 1773, and as part
of the Loyal Company Grant, the annexed figure of land lying in Fincastle Co. on the South fork
of Holston, containing 176 acres and bounded as follows...adjoining John Thomas and Henry
Bowen.

Surveyed 9 March 1774 (on same date for Henry Bowen, 426 acres, part of Loyal Co. Grant,
South Fork of Holston and for John Thomas, 404 acres, part of Loyal Co. Grant, South Fork
of Holston, both tracts "corner to Wm Lewis".
p. 198 - surveyed for Wm Lewis - part of Loyal Company Grant - lying in Fincastle County -
southwest side of South Fork of Holston - containing 204 acres - beginning Bank of Two-mile
Creek - surveyed 16 May 1775.


Will of William Lewis, dated 16 November 1784
Sons: Griffeth (eldest), William, John & Thomas Lewis
Dau's: Ann Stevens and Margaret Bishop
Wit: John ROBINSON & John THOMAS
"I sign this as my Last will"
William Lewis (his mark)
16 Nov. 1784 ". . . appoint Griffeth Lewis & Abraham Stevens, executors.
Wit: same William Lewis (his mark)
Proven and recorded 21 December 1784 John Campbell, CWC

Someone else contributed to the above information also but I don't remember who since I have saved notes and haven't done any research on my lines for several years.

Marianne Dillow
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