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James W. Ruble

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James W. Ruble

Penny Sawyer (View posts)
Posted: 10 May 1999 6:00AM GMT
Classification: Biography
Surnames: RUBLE, RUSE, WILLIAMSON, SHAFER, THARP, THRAILKILL, BROWN, BREAK
From the "History of Huntington County, 1914"

JAMES W. RUBLE

In the annals of early settlement of Huntington county, one of the names which is first to be mentioned is that of the Ruble family, and it is of this family that James W. Ruble of Salamonie township is a prominent representative. For more than sixty-five years the name has had its place in the history of Huntington county, and James W. Ruble is one of the older native sons of the county, and has been long identified with the industry of agriculture, a vocation which brings credit to its follower and helps to create the resources and wealth of the community. James W. Ruble is known far and wide as the proprietor of the Merry Hill Farm, a highly developed country estate of eighty acres, situated two and a quarter miles northeast of Warren.

James W. Ruble was born in Salamonie township at what is known as the Locust Glen farm, March 4, 1852, a son of Jonathan and Ruth (Ruse) Ruble. His father was a son of Walter and Sarah Ruble, and was born November 9, 1816, in Clinton county, Ohio. It was during his childhood that his parents left Ohio and settled in Randolph county, Indiana, where he grew to manhood, but subsequently returned to his native county, where on April 28, 1842, he married Ruth Ruse, She was a daughter of Thomas and Margaret Ruse, and was born February 13,1823. A few years after his marriage Jonathan Ruble made a change of residence and established his home in 1848 in what was still the wilderness of Salamonie township of Huntington county. His useful labors helped to broaden the scope of cultivated land in that section, and he was a man of influence and fine character. His death occurred January 20, 1872. He and his wife were very active as Methodists in their community, and took a regular part in the activities of their home church. The faith which they possessed they carried into all their daily activities, and their home was noted not only for its hospitality to friends but for the kindness which emanated from its doors and which made it a source of help and comfort to many who needed assistance in distress. There were ten children in the family, and four are yet living: Mary J. is the wife of Levi Williamson; Sarah L. E. is the wife of Philip Shafer of Salamonie township; Aaron Ruble lives in Jefferson township; and James W. is the youngest of the four still living.

His boyhood was spent in the wholesome environment of the country, and his education was acquired by attendance at the old fashioned district schools, a type of educational institutions which have long since gone out of vogue, and there are perhaps only one or two schoolhouses in the entire county which would bear any resemblance to the temple of learning which Mr. Ruble attended as a boy. After his education was finished and he had made a practical beginning of his career as a farmer, he married Berthena Tharp, a sister of Isaac M. Tharp. She was born in Wells county, Indiana. Of the six children of that marriage, four are still living, and their mother passed away July 25, 1888. The living children are: Alva D., a florist in Indianapolis; Charles, who is married and a farmer in Salamonie township; Mamie, wife of George Brown of Liberty Center, Indiana; Lucy, wife of Leonard Break of Adams county, Indiana. For his second marriage Mr. Ruble married Alice (Thrailkill) Day, widow of Richard Day. Mrs. Ruble was born in Liberty township of Wells county, August 23, 1862, grew up there, received her education in the common schools of her native township, and was a daughter of Silas Thrailkill, who was born in Clinton county, Ohio, August 5, 1834, and died July 15, 1901.

Mr. and Mrs. Ruble are active members of the Methodist Protestant church, of which he is one of the trustees and has long been one of its most liberal supporters. In politics a Republican, he has often used his influence in the party for the benefit of good government in the locality, and is a man whose opinion and advice are much courted in this part of Huntington county.
SubjectAuthorDate Posted
Penny Sawyer 10 May 1999 12:00PM GMT 
Barnie31 3 Dec 2001 3:15AM GMT 
fred morris 21 Dec 2001 7:47PM GMT 
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