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William L. Folk

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William L. Folk

Posted: 22 Nov 2003 10:16PM GMT
Classification: Biography
Surnames: Folk & Schofield
“History of Huntington County, Indiana”1914 By Frank S. Bash pg. 831-32

William L. Folk. For a period of more than thirty years William L. Folk has acted in the capacity of agent for the Standard Oil Company, and during seventeen years of this time has been the representative of this great industry at Huntington, Indiana. One of his company’s most trusted employes, he has given of his best abilities in its service, yet has never failed to find time to give to the interests of the community in which he has made his home for so long. Mr. Folk was born March 20, 1865, in Pennsylvania, and is a son of John H. and Elizabeth Folk, also natives of the Keystone state, where the father was for many years engaged in contracting and building.

Mr. Folk obtained his education in the public schools of his native place, and secured his introduction to business life as an employe in the works of the Union File Company, of Philadelphia. He was still a lad when he went to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to accept a position with the Standard Oil Company, in 1882, and after several years in that city was sent to the oil shops of the same concern at Cleveland, Ohio. There he remained, still in a minor capacity, until removing to Fostoria, Ohio, and from the latter place came in July, 1896, to Huntington, Indiana, having been appointed agent for this city. Practically all of Mr. Folk’s career has been passed in the employ of his present firm, and his business life has been one of constant and continued advancement. He was content to start in a humble position and learn thoroughly every branch of the business, so that today he is possessed of a broad knowledge of the line with which he is identified. His specified duties consist of taking charge of the storing of the oil which is contained in the immense tanks here, and this oil is distributed in Huntington and the surrounding towns by three wagons. The capacity of the storing plant is thirty thousand gallons, supported by brick walls with aisles between, so that the wagons may be driven directly underneath and thus affording easy facilities for filling. Mr. Folk is widely and favorably known among the business men of Huntington, and his judgment is frequently sought as to matters of importance both in his own line and in others. He has no outside connections, however, except his poultry business, to which he devotes his leisure hours. Starting this as a hobby, he has gradually developed it into a paying venture, and his Buff Orpingtons are in great demand all over this part of the county.

Mr. Folk was married to Miss Ella Schofield, of Toledo, Ohio, a daughter of William Schofield, a citizen of that place. To this union there have been born three children, all daughters: Bernice E., Martha D. and Jenies M. The pleasant family home, amid beautiful surroundings, is located on First street. Mr. Folk is a member of Amity Lodge No. 483, F. & A. M., Huntington Chapter No. 27, R. A. M., and Huntington Commandery No. 35, K. T., of the Masonic fraternity, and also holds membership in the local lodge of Elks. He has never aspired to public office, but is known as a public-spirited citizen who has the welfare of his community at heart.

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