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Tully Anson

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Tully Anson

Posted: 8 Oct 2002 6:23AM GMT
Classification: Biography
Edited: 19 Oct 2002 9:46AM GMT
"History of Huntington County, Indiana"1914 By Frank S. Bash pg. 566-67

Tully Anson. Union township is noted for its industries and able farmers, and public spirited citizens. One of these is Tully Anson, who represents one of the pioneer families in this section, and who is proprietor of the Ranacross Farm, located four and a half miles northeast of Huntington, on the Fort Wayne Traction line, and in a very eligible position, for all the demands of modern agriculture. Mr. Anson is a man who has never been content to follow without question in the beaten paths traveled by his predecessors, and has always been extremely progressive, ready to adopt improvements which have been thoroughly tested, and has also contributed out of his own original mind to the better welfare of agriculture and its followers. Thousands of farmers in Indiana and elsewhere cultivate what is known as the Anson Dent and the Anson White Corn, a variety of maize, which is the result of Mr. Anson's careful selection and cross fertilization. Mr. Anson has a very handsome farmstead, and its situation on the traction line gives him practical city facilities.

Tully Anson was born in Union township, September 9, 1868, a son of John J. and Susan (Elkins) Anson. Both the father and grandfather, Samuel Anson, were natives of Clinton county, Ohio, where John J. was born, February 9, 1825, and probably of English descent. Susan Elkins was a native of Virginia. John Anson was married in Ohio, and in 1844 came into Huntington county as one of the early settlers, locating in Union township. Twelve years were spent by him in Huntington City, but with that exception he lived in Union township, with his wife, until their long and industrious years came to a close. Their journey from Clinton county, Ohio, was made in a wagon, and not for some years were any railroads built in this section of the state, and the Ansons are among the people who had their full share in clearing away the forests and establishing homes in the wilderness. John J. Anson was a hunter and fisherman, possessed a very rugged physique, and was of active, vigorous temperament, and was known in the community as a man who never failed in any undertaking. He cleared up a large amount of land, was noted as a rail splitter in the early days, and for a number of years was associated with the late John Roche. John Anson at one time kept the only store at Union Station, in his township. His acreage as a farmer usually ran about two hundred, and his possessions and activities made him one of the prominent men in Union township. Besides being a first-class business man, and successful from a material point of view, he was active in religion and a liberal contributor to the Union church. A Jackson Democrat in politics, he served in the office of justice of the peace during his residence in the city of Huntington. There were seven children, and four are still living: Samuel, a retired farmer at Warsaw, Indiana; Tennie, wife of I.E. Ward, of Union township; and Addie, wife of James Carl, of Columbus, Indiana. Tully Anson was reared on the home farm and at the proper age entered the Huntington public schools. After graduating from the high school in 1885, he was first employed as agent, and storekeeper at Mardenis, and from that gradually got into farming as a permanent vocation. Mr. Anson married Miss Nettie Hoster, a daughter of John and Mary (Harter) Hoster. Mrs. Anson was educated in the district schools. Their four living children are: Charles E., who graduated from the Union township high school, studied at Angola Tri-State College, and now has charge of the sixth, seventh, and eighth grades in the Union township schools; Clara, a graduate of the high school, and the wife of Ernest Beaver; Mary and Allen, both at home. Mrs. Anson is a member of the Mount Zion Brethren church, and the family attend Zion church. Mr. Anson has long taken an active part in democratic politics, and also in public affairs, from the standpoint of good government, and from 1904 to 1908 served as trustee of Union township.

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