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Thomas Standish 1612- 1692 Wethersfield Hartford Connecticut, USA

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Re: Thomas Standish 1612- 1692 Wethersfield Hartford Connecticut, USA

Posted: 1481080105000
Classification: Query







I hope this helps some, if you are still looking for him...



FIRST PURITAN SETTLERS OF WETHERSFIELD, CONN


The First Settlers of Wethersfield.

Richard Belden, Jacob Waterhouse, William Boarman, John Roote, Richard Wastecoat, Jeremiah Jagger, Samuel Barrett, Robert Burrows or Barrows, John Northern!, William Bramfield, Robert Beedle, Enoch Buck, John Bishop, Joseph Bennett, John Brundish, Wm. Palmer, Enoch Buckley, Hon. James and Joseph Boosey, Wm. Bascum, Jasper Rawling, Dorothy Chester, Robert Abbott, Leonard and John Chester, Richard Crabb, Robert Coe, Thomas Coop, Amos Williams, George Chappell, Josiah or Joseph Churchill, John Whitmore, Mr. Chaplin, Matthew Mitchell, John Coltman, William Colefax, Richard Park, John Curtice, Thomas Ufford, William Dickinson, Rev. Richard Denton, Rev. Peter Prudden, John Edwards, Rev. Henry Smith, Fracis Kilbourn, John Doming, Joseph Edwards, Abraham Elson, Nathniel Foster, Daniel and John Finch, Nathaniel Foot, Richard Gildersleve, John Johnson, Richard Harris, John Tinker, Thomas Hurlbut, Thomas Hubbard, John Gibbs, Joseph Hollister, John Harrison, Richard Smith, John Kilbourn his father and family, Samuel Ireland, Richard Laws, Mrs. Lattimore, Andrew Landon, Richard Montague, Andrew Langdon, Matthew Williams, Benjamin Munn, John Nott, John and Edward Pierce, Joseph and John Plumb, Thurston Rayner, John Reynolds. Richard Riley, John Robins, Robert Rose, John Saddler, Lieut. Robert Seeley, Joseph and Samuel Sherman, Thomas Stanton, Thomas Standish, John Stoddar, Hon. Thomas Tracy, Richard Treat, Richard and Matthias Trott, Ephraim Turner, John Wadams, John Miller, Hon. Andrew Ward, Joyce Ward, Josias Willard, Jonas Wood, William Swain, Thomas Wright, Thomas Atwood, William Biggs, George Hubbard, Thomas Couch, Wm. Tailer, Benjamin Crane, Leonard Dix, Thomas Fenner, John Goodridge, John Hilton, John Betts, Alexander Keeney, Thomas Hanset, Edward Mason, Charles Taintor, (1640,) Widow Paine. Not as early, James Boswell, John Russell, jr., Edward Stott, Philip Goose, Hitchcock Lake, Samuel Hale, John Kirbe, John Latemore, John Lilly, John Westfall, Francis Yates.

Thomas Standish Tombstone

Thomas STANDISH - b. about 1612, England; d. Dec. 5, 1692, Wethersfield, Hartford Co., CT. Thomas married second about 1660, probably at Wethersfield, CT, Susannah SMITH (b. about 1624, England; d. Nov. 30, 1692,Wethersfield, Hartford Co., CT), the daughter of Richard SMITH. Gov. Dr. John Winthrop, Jr. records "Patient, Thomas Standish his wife, Susanne Smith, daughter of old Richard Smith." The name of Thomas' first wife, believed to be the mother of Lydia, is not known.

HISTORY OF WETHERSFIELD (CT) - Stiles, Henry R. - 1904 - Vol. II, page 658:

STANDISH, THOMAS, b. Eng., 1610-1612, has been supp. to have come from the Plymouth Colony, arriving in Wethersfield abt. 1636. His ancestral connections are broken by imperfect records, but his descendants are led to believe (through authentic tradition) that he was a son of Capt. Miles Standish, of Plymouth, by his first wife Rose, in Eng., though the Captain's will alludes only to four sons by his second wife Barbara. If not a son, however, he must have been either a nephew, or a younger brother of that redoubtable warrior -- but definite proof can only be ascertained by careful search of Eng. records. The striking physical resemblance, traits of character and succession of family names, certainly seem to bear out the relationship perfectly well.

Thomas Standish's early connection with Wethersfield, seems to have been much the same as that of Capt. Miles with Plymouth. He was the keeper of the Fort of Weth., and was a soldier in the Pequot expedition of 1637, for which (in 1671) he rec'd a gt. of ld. fronting on the entire length of Fort St., on its S. side, its rear being on what was then termed "The Wilderness" (now State St.), and a portion of which is still held in the family. His home-lot (rec. 1641) was on what is now known as the Esther Bidwell place, on Main St., abt. 30 rods N. from present Southworth's corner. He also bo't another piece of ppy. ext. Southward from Jordan Lane to a point abt. 1/5 of a mile. -- See, also, Chapt. VII. He was on a comm. to secure a minister, 1665, was made a freeman in 1669; dr. lds. in 1670. He m. Susanna (Francis?), who d. 30 Nov., 1692, ae. 68; followed closely by him, 5 Dec., 1693, ae. 80.

Children:
1. Thomas. Fam. 2
2. Sarah, m. John Wyard, 7 Apl., 1681
3. Eunice, m. Nath'l Stoddard, 7 Dec, 1693.
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THEORY OF CONNECTION TO MYLES STANDISH OF THE MAYFLOWER:

Captain Myles Standish came in the Mayflower in 1620, hired as military commander and defender of the Plymouth Colony. He was accompanied by his wife Rose, who died during the 'First Winter'. Captain Myles Standish remarried after Rose's death to Barbara Allen who came to Plymouth aboard the 'Anne' in 1622. Many Standish descendants believe Barbara was the sister of Rose Standish and also believe she possibly brought his son Thomas Standish with her from England. Thomas Standish also could have been the child of an earlier marriage as little is known of Capt Myles' earlier life except that he was a professional military man who served in England and on the continent before being hired by the Plymouth Bay Company. Thomas Standish WAS NOT mentioned in the will of Capt. Myles in October 3, 1655 - only the children of wife Barbara were mentioned. By that date Thomas Standish was a mature man of considerable estate. He was a founder of Wethersfield, CT and built the fort and fortifications there before settlement. He had military training, and, according to contemporary Wethersfield accounts, a strong physical resemblence to Capt Myles. Wethersfield settlers believed Thomas Standish was the son of Capt Myles Standish. Thomas being left out of his father's will was not unusual for an older child from a previous marriage who had already been well provided for. When Capt Myles died several of his sons were only in their twenties and obviously in need of a start in life. There was also the influence of their mother, Barbara, who naturally would expect her children to be given an inheritance equal to her stepson's earlier.
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A GENEALOGICAL DICTIONARY OF THE FIRST SETTLERS OF NEW ENGLAND, BEFORE 1692 - Vol. 4 - Savage, James - 1860-62:

STANDISH, THOMAS, Wethersfield, a soldier in the Pequot war 1637, had gr. of ld. on that acco. 1671, is on the list of freem. 169_, and his d. Eunice m. 7 Dec. 1693, Nathaniel Stoddard. He d. 1692, aged 80, and Susanna, his w. d. the same yr. aged 68. Perhaps she was sec. w. but prob. mo. of Eunice. He had, also, s. Thomas, and perhaps more ch.
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MAYFLOWER MYTHS - Thomas Standish. There is no evidence Thomas Standish of Wethersfield, Connecticut, was a son of Myles Standish. [MFIP Standish; see also the will of Myles Standish, which does not mention a son named Thomas]















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Standish





Maybe an Ancestor - Myles Standish





Myles Standish - Maybe an Ancestor





He’s the kind of ancestor anyone would be proud of: a hero and also a compassionate, humble man. So Myles Standish is included in our family tree, even though he might not belong there.





An English military officer, Myles Standish was captain of the Mayflower and the first commander of the Plymouth colony. Later he served as Plymouth's representative in England, assistant governor of Plymouth, and as the colony's treasurer. Besides being remembered for his bravery in battle and his reputation as a military captain, he was immortalized through Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's fictitious poem, “The Courtship of Miles Standish” (although he’s the one who didn’t get the girl).



His status as military advisor and ship’s captain did not make Standish too proud to serve others, however. When illness struck the Pilgrims soon after they arrived in Plymouth, Myles Standish faithfully cared for those who were ill. One of only six or seven people who were not sick, Standish “spared no pains night or day, but with abundance of toil and hazard of their own health, fetched them wood, made them fires, dressed their meat, made their beds, washed their clothes, clothed and unclothed them." (William Bradford, History of Plymouth Plantation)




Our family alleges kinship with Myles Standish through Thomas Standish. Born in England about 1610, Thomas arrived in Wethersfield, Connecticut, about 1636. He was the builder and keeper of the Fort of Wethersfield and a soldier in the Pequot expedition of 1637, for which he received additional bounty land.



Was Myles the father of Thomas? Possibly – but not definitely. "His ancestral connections are broken by imperfect records,” writes genealogist Henry Stiles, “but his descendants are led to believe (through authentic tradition) that he was a son of Capt. Miles Standish, of Plymouth, by his first wife Rose, in Eng., though the Captain's will alludes only to four sons by his second wife Barbara.” (History of Ancient Wethersfield)



When Myles Standish wrote his will, however, Thomas Standish was a mature man who owned considerable property. Being left out of a father's will would not be unusual for an older who had already been provided for, especially when there were younger sons who needed a start in life. It is also likely that Myles’ second wife, Barbara, would influence her husband to give her sons an inheritance equal to the help their father had given earlier to Thomas.



Thomas’ contemporaries, the Wethersfield settlers, believed Thomas Standish was the son of Capt Myles Standish. According to their accounts, Thomas had a strong physical resemblance to Capt Myles. “If not a son, he must have been either a nephew, or a younger brother. The striking physical resemblance, traits of character and succession of family names, certainly seem to bear out the relationship perfectly well." (Stiles)




Who wouldn’t want to claim Myles Standish as an ancestor? He is famous in American history - captain of the Mayflower, a brave military commander, leader of the Plymouth Colony, and a good, kind man. Since Thomas Standish apparently looked like him, acted like him, and bore the Standish name, we’ll claim Myles as Thomas’ father -- even without absolute proof.

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